Randolph College Home Page Give Today! Support Randolph College
AboutAdmissionUndergraduateGraduateAcademicsUndergraduateGraduateStudent LifeAthleticsOutcomesAlumnae & AlumniParents & FamiliesInside RandolphAPPLYREQUESTVISITNEWSEVENTSSupport RandolphSearch

Home

Asian Studies

Randolph students can craft an Asian Studies minor that will prepare them for the ever-increasing career opportunities available to those with a grasp of the languages, contemporary affairs, and rich traditions of Asia.

Why Pursue Asian Studies at Randolph?

Randolph College offers a breadth of academic expertise, with particularly strong course offerings on the Middle East, the Indian subcontinent and the Tibetan plateau, and the east Asian cultures of China, Japan, and Korea, as well as the Asian diaspora.  

With exposure to Asia’s monumental contributions to humankind in the areas of political organization, religion, art, philosophy, and technology, students can craft Asian Studies minors that will prepare them for careers in a variety of fields.

Degrees offered

Asian Studies interdisciplinary minor

Curriculum and Courses

Related Programs

Opportunities for Experience

Study Abroad

Spend a year or a semester studying, living, and learning abroad.  Broaden your perspective while gaining the skills you need to succeed in our global society.

Randolph College has affilate agreements with two institutions in Japan:

Students can choose our other affiliates in the United Kingdom or Spain, faculty-led Study Seminar trips, special programs through academic departments, or design their own experiences.

Learn more about Study Abroad.

Model UN Team

In recent years, our student delegations to the National Model United Nations (NMUN) conference in New York City have consistently been honored among the best.

Participation is selective and chosen delegates take a full credit class to prepare.

Delegates learn the structure, systems, and history of the UN with an emphasis on writing, research, speaking, and collaboration.

Intercultural Competence

All Randolph students learn global citizenship with the capability to accurately understand and adapt to cultural differences and find commonality.

Asian Studies majors must gain working knowledge of at least one Asian language and a broad understanding of the modern political history, economy, diplomacy, and societies of Asian countries—especially the two most prominent players in East Asia: China and Japan.

Summer Research Program

Spend the summer working closely with a professor on a focused aspect of an Asian Studies topic of your choosing.

Randolph’s intensive eight-week Summer Research Program enables students to work with professors on a research of their own design; live in a residence hall on campus, participate in on-campus summer events, attend special seminars with guest speakers; and share the progress and results of their research.

Learn more about the Summer Research Program.

Symposium of Artists and Scholars

Modeled after a traditional academic conference, the SAS brings together students of all disciplines to share the results and highlights of the best work being produced at the College –  oral presentations, readings of creative works, performances, exhibitions of student artwork, and poster presentations.

Learn more about the Symposium of Artists and Scholars.

Internships

Learn by doing – in the field and on the job.  The Career Development Center will help place you in positions with leading companies and organizations in your field of study.

Learn more about internship opportunities.

Unique Experiences

Outcomes

Historic Preservation Law

Janie Campbell ’12, history major
Preservation Consultant, law firm of Rogers Lewis Jackson Mann & Quinn, LLC, Columbia, South Carolina

Janie’s group works with developers seeking tax credits for rehabilitating historic properties.

“I work closely with project architects to ensure that historic, character defining elements of each building are preserved and restored, which can vary tremendously as what is significant to a 1929 airplane hangar is vastly different from what makes a 1963 mid-century modern motel unique!”

She writes National Register of Historic Places nominations and Historic Preservation Certification applications, which detail the property’s significance.  She also conducts site visits to ensure work is being completed as described and photographs the before, during, and after conditions of each project.

“Randolph certainly laid the foundation for my research and writing skills. The Summer Research Program, in particular, prepared me for the type of place-based research I do now. “

Opportunities

Top Ranked Professors

Randolph College’s faculty are consistently recognized as among the best in the nation. The Princeton Review ranked the College in the Top 20 for most accessible professors in the 2021 edition of its flagship college guide, The Best 387 Colleges.

Randolph has been ranked in the top 20 for most accessible professors for four consecutive years.

Asian Studies Faculty

Mara Amster

Charles A. Dana Professor of English, Associate Provost of the College

Read More... Mara Amster

Andrea Campbell

Professor of Art History

Read More... Andrea Campbell

Only at Randolph

Randolph students can take advantage of unique programs which give them a more enriching education than can be found anywhere else.

The Randolph Plan

Randolph students work with faculty mentors to explore a broad range of disciplines as they chart their academic path.

Learn More
Money for Your Research

The Randolph Innovative Student Experience (RISE) program provides every student a $2,000 grant to fund research, creative work, experiential learning or other scholarly pursuits.

Learn More
TAKE2

Two courses per half-mester means you get to focus in and dig deep into your coursework while still having time for the rest of the college experience. Two classes. Seven weeks. Repeat.

Learn More
The Liberal Arts Advantage

Randolph graduates learn to think critically, solve problems and work well with others. They are prepared to succeed in all aspects of life.

Learn More

Department News

William Olichney ’24 uses RISE grant for immersive language program in Mandarin

Memories from his summer in Taiwan come quickly to William Olichney ’24.

Read More

Randolph professor, students traveling to Nepal for ASIANetwork-funded research

The three-week trip to Nepal is funded by an ASIANetwork Freeman Student-Faculty Fellowship. 

Read More

Tibetan filmmaker Ngawang Choephel to screen film at Randolph

"Ganden: A Joyful Land," which documents the lives and memories of the last Tibetan Buddhist monks to study at the famous Ganden Monastery in Tibet, will be shown at 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 12, in Nichols Theatre. 

Read More

History major gets firsthand look at historic preservation through Nantucket internship

William Olichney ’24 spent six weeks at Preservation Institute Nantucket, an internship funded for a Randolph student each year by A.J. and Lynn Land ’60, this summer.

Read More

No longer invisible: Randolph student shines a spotlight on Asian-American filmmakers

This summer, Mengna Zhao ’23 is teaming up with media and culture professor Jennifer Gauthier to examine the work of Asian and Asian-American filmmakers as part of Randolph’s Summer Research Program.

Read More

William Olichney ’24 uses RISE grant for immersive language program in Mandarin

Memories from his summer in Taiwan come quickly to William Olichney ’24.

Read More

Randolph professor, students traveling to Nepal for ASIANetwork-funded research

The three-week trip to Nepal is funded by an ASIANetwork Freeman Student-Faculty Fellowship. 

Read More

Tibetan filmmaker Ngawang Choephel to screen film at Randolph

"Ganden: A Joyful Land," which documents the lives and memories of the last Tibetan Buddhist monks to study at the famous Ganden Monastery in Tibet, will be shown at 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 12, in Nichols Theatre. 

Read More

History major gets firsthand look at historic preservation through Nantucket internship

William Olichney ’24 spent six weeks at Preservation Institute Nantucket, an internship funded for a Randolph student each year by A.J. and Lynn Land ’60, this summer.

Read More

No longer invisible: Randolph student shines a spotlight on Asian-American filmmakers

This summer, Mengna Zhao ’23 is teaming up with media and culture professor Jennifer Gauthier to examine the work of Asian and Asian-American filmmakers as part of Randolph’s Summer Research Program.

Read More
Facebook Twitter Instagram LinkedIn YouTube RSS Feeds Snapchat

Mara Amster

Charles A. Dana Professor of English, Associate Provost of the College

Credentials:BA, Duke University
MA, University of Virginia
PhD, University of Rochester
Associated Departments:English, Renaissance Studies
Office:Smith 406
Phone:4349478514
Email:mamster@randolphcollege.edu

News Headlines

While I teach Shakespeare, Renaissance Drama, Women Writers, and the first half of the British Literature survey, I think I am famous (infamous, perhaps?) for my Renaissance Literature class, subtitled “Unruly Women.” In this upper-level course, we examine a wealth of writing (drama, poetry, medical treatises, legal documents, royal proclamations, and sermons) that concerns itself with the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries most unruly women: prostitutes, murderesses, witches, and virgins. The class, based on my own scholarly research on female sexuality, gendered representations, and Renaissance literature and culture, allows us to make connections between life in the 21st century and life in the 17th century; the concerns that preoccupied and even obsessed our Renaissance writers — the bodies, minds, and souls of women — often sound quite familiar to us.

In all my classes, students discover that while Renaissance writing may seem dated, it still has the power to shock, fascinate, amuse, and disturb us. It can be silly, scary, or sexy, or sometimes all three simultaneously.

In 2005-06 I was a Visiting Research Associate at the Women’s Studies Research Center at Brandeis University. While there I completed work on a two-volume anthology – Texts on Prostitution, 1592-1633 and Texts on Prostitution, 1635-1700 – that was published in February 2007. Currently I am working on The Purchase of Pleasure: Representing Prostitution and the Early Modern Market, a book that examines seventeenth-century representations of prostitution and its relationship to pleasure, performance, pornography, and profit.

×

Andrea Campbell

Professor of Art History

Credentials:B.A., The American University
M.A., PhD., Rutgers State University of New Jersey

Associated Departments:Art History and Studio Art, Museum and Heritage Studies, Renaissance Studies
Office:Leggett 536
Phone:434.947.8483
Email:acampbell@randolphcollege.edu

News Headlines

As an undergraduate in Washington, D.C., I had the opportunity to study original works of art at the National Gallery and was enthralled by their collection of Italian Renaissance art. Italian Renaissance art is now my specialty, and I teach a range of courses at Randolph including Ancient, Medieval, and Baroque art, as well as Museum Studies. The interdisciplinary approach that framed my undergraduate education in Renaissance Studies still informs my teaching and research, and some of my favorite classes are those I co-teach with colleagues, such as Masterworks of Greek and Roman Art, a course that combines the perspectives of archaeology and art history.

The study of art and the material of our cultural patrimony has never been more critical to our lives as citizens. My students learn how to reconstruct the original meaning of works of art and architecture while being encouraged to consider their roles as historians and challenged to pose new questions.  The skills gained in critical thinking and writing, in addition to the ability to read and discern meaning in our visual environment, are some of the powerful tools gained in the study of art history that serve our students well in all their future occupations.

I am dedicated to getting students in front of original works of art and take students on field trips to all sorts of museums, both in our area and in nearby cities such as Richmond and Washington. My favorite course culminates in a two-week study tour in Italy; it is a great joy for me to witness students experience the power of Italian art in a way that can never be matched in the classroom.

My research interests include fifteenth-century Sienese art and culture, the subject of a current book project, and issues of patronage and iconography in Venetian painting and sculpture, which will be explored in two future projects.

×