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Museum and Heritage Studies

Our unique interdisciplinary program is based on hands-on experiences and direct work with collections. 

Students curating the Our Animal Nature exhibit.

Why Museum and Heritage Studies at Randolph?

Students develop practical skills in this unique, interdisciplinary pre-professional major centered on hands-on experiences and direct work with collections.

Based on Randolph College’s world-class Maier Museum of Art and the College’s notable natural history, archaeology, and ancient collections, students learn fresh perspectives about the role of museums and public history sites.

The Center for Career Development connects students to internships and fieldwork with professional organizations in the US and abroad, including the Preservation Institute Nantucket and the Archaeological Conservation Institute (Italy).

Graduates emerge equipped with the knowledge and experience for careers in interpreting and presenting visual and material culture.

 

Degrees offered

Bachelor of Arts Degree in Museum and Heritage Studies

Minor in Museum and Heritage Studies

Curriculum and Courses

Related Programs

Art History

History

Classical Studies

Unique Experiences

The Maier Museum of Art at Randolph College

Randolph College’s nationally recognized Maier Museum of Art features works by outstanding American artists of the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries. The College has been collecting American art since 1920 and now holds a collection of several thousand paintings, prints, drawings, and photographs.  The Maier’s permanent collection tells the story of the development of American Art and the intrinsically connected growth of America’s expansion and history.

An annual exhibition of contemporary art, known as “The Annual,” continues the narrative with a focus on the art and issues of our time. Established in 1911, it the is longest running exhibition of contemporary art presented at an academic institution in the United States.  

The Maier hosts an active schedule of special exhibitionsvisiting artists and scholars, and education programs throughout the year. Through its programsinternshipsmuseum studies practicums, and class visits, the Maier Museum of Art provides valuable learning opportunities for Randolph students and our community at large.

maiermuseum.org

The Randolph College Natural History and Archaeology Collections

The Randolph College Natural History and Archaeology Collections, established in 1895, contain hundreds of zoological specimens including birds, mammals, fishes, reptiles, insects, marine invertebrates, and fossils. The collections boast an excellent herbarium containing thousands of specimens of plants indigenous or introduced to the eastern United States, specifically Central Virginia. Also notable is the large geology collection, featuring thousands of rock and mineral samples from around the world. The archaeological collections contain artifacts and remains from local and classical Mediterranean sites.

Through classwork, internship, and volunteer opportunities, the Natural History and Archaeology Collections offer a cross-disciplinary approach to developing crucial skills of observation and methodology in the research of natural sciences.

The National Gallery, London

A One of a Kind Partnership

Randolph is the only college or university in the United States that offers an internship at the National Gallery of Art, London.

Two students spend eight weeks of the summer learning museum work at one of the world’s greatest painting collections.

The partnership also brings high-level staff members of the National Gallery to campus for lectures and master classes with Randolph students.  

Learn more about the National Gallery, London internship program.

Internships

In addition to the hands-on learning students regularly experience at the Maier Museum of Art and with the Randolph College natural history, archaeology, and ancient collections, majors are required to complete at least two internships.

Randolph College’s impressive range of internships and fieldwork with professional organizations in the U.S. and abroad give students access to exceptional resources for research and career exploration.

Students take advantage of architectural preservation institutes, archaeological field schools, public history internships, curatorial and museum education internships, both around the country and in local archives, collections, and museums, such as Thomas Jefferson’s Poplar Forest.

Opportunities

Top Ranked Professors

Randolph College’s faculty are consistently recognized as among the best in the nation. The Princeton Review ranked the College in the Top 20 for most accessible professors in the 2023 edition of its flagship college guide, The Best 388 Colleges.

Randolph has been ranked in the top 20 for most accessible professors for six consecutive years.

Museum and Heritage Studies Faculty

Andrea Campbell

Professor of Art History

Read More... Andrea Campbell

Gerard Sherayko

Professor of History

Read More... Gerard Sherayko

Laura McManus

Curator of Education, Maier Museum of Art at Randolph College

Read More... Laura McManus

Lesley Shipley

Associate Professor of Art History

Read More... Lesley Shipley

Susan Stevens

Professor of Classics Emeritus

Read More... Susan Stevens

Department News

New Randolph exhibit focuses on marine plastic pollution

"Entangled and Ingested," which opens Jan. 12 in Hampson Commons, located in the Student Center, features seven life-sized collage portraits using plastic film to document animals that are harmed by marine plastic pollution.

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Keith Harvey ’22 named site director for the American Civil War Museum in Appomattox

Harvey majored in museum and heritage studies at Randolph.

Read More

College partners with Jones Memorial Library to explore legacies of slavery

“Lynchburg: Named" brought brought together Randolph and the Jones Memorial Library to explore the region’s legacy of slavery and fill in information gaps related to African Americans in Lynchburg. 

Read More

New Randolph exhibit focuses on marine plastic pollution

"Entangled and Ingested," which opens Jan. 12 in Hampson Commons, located in the Student Center, features seven life-sized collage portraits using plastic film to document animals that are harmed by marine plastic pollution.

Read More

Keith Harvey ’22 named site director for the American Civil War Museum in Appomattox

Harvey majored in museum and heritage studies at Randolph.

Read More

College partners with Jones Memorial Library to explore legacies of slavery

“Lynchburg: Named" brought brought together Randolph and the Jones Memorial Library to explore the region’s legacy of slavery and fill in information gaps related to African Americans in Lynchburg. 

Read More

Only at Randolph

Randolph students can take advantage of unique programs which give them a more enriching education than can be found anywhere else.

Money for Your Research

The Randolph Innovative Student Experience (RISE) program provides every student a $2,000 grant to fund research, creative work, experiential learning or other scholarly pursuits.

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The Randolph Plan

Randolph students work with faculty mentors to explore a broad range of disciplines as they chart their academic path.

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The Liberal Arts Advantage

Randolph graduates learn to think critically, solve problems and work well with others. They are prepared to succeed in all aspects of life.

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TAKE2

Two courses per half-mester means you get to focus in and dig deep into your coursework while still having time for the rest of the college experience. Two classes. Seven weeks. Repeat.

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Andrea Campbell

Professor of Art History

Credentials:B.A., The American University
M.A., PhD., Rutgers State University of New Jersey

Associated Departments:Art History and Studio Art, Museum and Heritage Studies, Renaissance Studies
Office:Leggett 536
Phone:434.947.8483
Email:acampbell@randolphcollege.edu

News Headlines

As an undergraduate in Washington, D.C., I had the opportunity to study original works of art at the National Gallery and was enthralled by their collection of Italian Renaissance art. Italian Renaissance art is now my specialty, and I teach a range of courses at Randolph including Ancient, Medieval, and Baroque art, as well as Museum Studies. The interdisciplinary approach that framed my undergraduate education in Renaissance Studies still informs my teaching and research, and some of my favorite classes are those I co-teach with colleagues, such as Masterworks of Greek and Roman Art, a course that combines the perspectives of archaeology and art history.

The study of art and the material of our cultural patrimony has never been more critical to our lives as citizens. My students learn how to reconstruct the original meaning of works of art and architecture while being encouraged to consider their roles as historians and challenged to pose new questions.  The skills gained in critical thinking and writing, in addition to the ability to read and discern meaning in our visual environment, are some of the powerful tools gained in the study of art history that serve our students well in all their future occupations.

I am dedicated to getting students in front of original works of art and take students on field trips to all sorts of museums, both in our area and in nearby cities such as Richmond and Washington. My favorite course culminates in a two-week study tour in Italy; it is a great joy for me to witness students experience the power of Italian art in a way that can never be matched in the classroom.

My research interests include fifteenth-century Sienese art and culture, the subject of a current book project, and issues of patronage and iconography in Venetian painting and sculpture, which will be explored in two future projects.

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Gerard Sherayko

Professor of History

Credentials:BA, Widener University
MA, Pennsylvania State University
PhD, Indiana University
Associated Departments:History, Museum and Heritage Studies
Office:Smith 304
Phone:434.947.8521
Email:gsherayko@randolphcollege.edu

News Headlines

When I applied for a teaching position here many years ago, I had never heard of the college. I knew I wanted to teach at a small school, but I had no idea how much I would fall in love with this campus, its students, and its emphasis on academics. This place is more than a job for me. There is something special here that makes you feel at home. We’re able to do so much more in class because of the college’s small size.

My classes give me the opportunity to help students understand their world and the importance of history. I teach courses on general modern European history, German history, and Russian history as well as seminars such as The Holocaust, Genocide, Propaganda, Women and the Two World Wars, Disasters, and the History of Christmas. I also teach a course entitled Paris and Berlin in the 1920s: A Cultural History. This class, inspired by my own scholarly research on the evolution of a consumer culture in Germany during the 1920s, explores the unprecedented explosion of artistic creativity that emerged from the cafes, cabarets, and studios of Paris and Berlin.

I also teach classes that are cross listed with the museum and heritage studies major. Those classes include Introduction to Public History, which explores, among other issues, the evolution of memorials, monuments, museums, historic sites, and national parks as well as the field of historic preservation. More than any other of my courses, this one is explicitly designed for those who imagine themselves working in the field of history but not necessarily as teachers in a standard classroom. Along with this course, I teach seminars on Race and Memory in American Life and World War II and Memory that delve deeper into specific issues of public history.

Like other professors here, I try to bring my classroom alive for students. You can’t learn everything from just one textbook. Since I love movies, I integrate films into all my classes. I also assign novels, memoirs, and biographies and utilize images to provide a visual context for many of the topics discussed in my courses. I also take full advantage of the historic sites that surround the college, from Thomas Jefferson’s two homes, Monticello and Poplar Forest, to the National D-Day Memorial, the Robert Russa Moton Museum (one of the schools that was part of the Brown vs. Board of Education case that resulted in the desegregation of public schools), and the Monacan Indian Nation Museum.  

I also take students further afield to sites including the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and the National Gallery in D.C. and the Virginia Museum History and Culture in Richmond. Nothing can take the place of visiting places where history happened or is presented, and I’m fortunate to be able to take students on many field trips over the course of an academic year.

As the years have passed, I have also brought more and more of my former students into my classes to share their expertise but also to share the stories about their careers and to provide advice to current students about how they too can pursue a career as a park ranger, historic preservationist, professional tour guide, or museum expert, among other careers.

Through our small classes, discussions, and trips, I have gotten to know students better than many of my colleagues at bigger institutions. Over the years my wife and I have attended many alumni weddings (nearly twenty) from Massachusetts to Washington state, from Bath, England to Houston, Texas, to those held on campus. I also enjoy visits from alums who have passed through town, keeping up via Zoom, and even planning our road trips around seeing former students.

Community involvement is important to me. I joined the board of the Holocaust Education Foundation of Central Virginia soon after I arrived in Lynchburg. As a member of the board, I have been able to help bring several guest speakers to Lynchburg to discuss issues surrounding the impact of the Holocaust. I’m also a board member of the Pierce Street Gateway (dedicated to the preservation and promotion of Lynchburg’s Pierce Street, an African American neighborhood with the largest concentration of state historic markers in Virginia) and the Jones Memorial Library (our region’s preeminent archive and genealogy library). I often get to use these commitments to provide opportunities for my students through internships and other experiences.

Besides my interest in history, I have a passion for historic preservation. Inspired by an architectural boat tour of Chicago back in the 1990s, I became involved in historic preservation efforts while a graduate student in Indiana. Starting in 2010, I participated in the College’s Summer Research Program to conduct research on the individual buildings within the Rivermont Avenue Historic District (including Randolph College). Working with six history majors over the years, we gathered information and took photos of the buildings within the Rivermont Avenue Historic District for the FORHS website, www.friendsofrivermont.org I have worked on other Summer Research Projects while at Randolph, including most recently on Virginia’s changing monument (particularly Confederate) landscape.  I hope to continue working with students on Summer Research Program projects, including on the history of our college.

When I’m not teaching, you are most likely to find me traveling. My wife, Carolyn, and I love to visit art museums, buildings designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, presidential sites, movie palaces, lighthouses, and classic diners. We also like to check out weird attractions such as the World’s Largest Bull or the World’s Largest Badger or the two competing World’s Largest Balls of Twine. We’ve even seen the World’s Largest Talking Cow, which rests beside the World’s Largest Replica Cheese in Neillsville, Wisconsin. As always, we hope to hit a few more presidential sites and unique roadside attractions (including the Boll Weevil Monument in Enterprise, Alabama) this year.

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Laura McManus

Curator of Education, Maier Museum of Art at Randolph College

Credentials:
Associated Departments:Museum and Heritage Studies
Phone:(434) 947-8136 ext. 5
Email:lmcmanus@randolphcollege.edu
Website:https://maiermuseum.org/education/

News Headlines

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Lesley Shipley

Associate Professor of Art History

Credentials:B.A., University of Maryland, College Park
M.F.A., American University
M.A., Bryn Mawr College
Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College
Associated Departments:Art History and Studio Art, Museum and Heritage Studies
Office:Leggett 533
Phone:4349478484
Email:lshipley@randolphcollege.edu

News Headlines

My research and teaching interests are in modern and contemporary art, with an emphasis on identity, feminism, activism, and abstraction in art since 1960. Currently, I am completing an article that examines the intersection of ethics and aesthetics in two installations by the contemporary Colombian artist Doris Salcedo. I’m also finalizing a paper on a series of reliefs by the American artist Lee Bontecou. I have presented my research at the Feminist Art History Conference, the Annual Conference of the College Art Association, the Asians in the Americas Conference, and the Association of Art Historians Annual Conference in Norwich, England.

At Randolph, I teach 19th-century European Art, Modern European Art, American Art and Architecture, and the second half of the survey of Western Art. Special topics that I plan to teach include “Race, Gender, and Sexuality in Contemporary Art”, “Art and Activism since 1960,” and “African American Art from Colonialism to the Present”.

I try to make the course material relevant to students and encourage them to develop their own perspectives on the subjects we investigate together. My approach to teaching stems from my belief in the power of students’ voices to co-construct the learning experience within the college classroom. This commitment to integrating student voice in the classroom closely aligns with my scholarly interests in issues of identity. I also have a graduate degree in fine arts and this training has furthered my commitment to keeping the work of art central to the study of art history. All of my courses take advantage of the resources at the Maier Museum of Art at Randolph College. The Maier’s outstanding collection and exhibitions make Randolph College an exceptional institution at which to study (and to teach!) the history of art.

When students complete my courses, I hope they are more confident in their abilities to ask important questions that are meaningful to them, to think and read critically and carefully, and to listen and look with a more open mind than when they arrived. These skills are relevant to all of the disciplines that they encounter in a liberal arts education and support a life-long love of learning. When I’m not teaching or writing, I enjoy painting and drawing, running, reading the New Yorker and cookbooks, traveling, and spending time with my family.

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Susan Stevens

Professor of Classics Emeritus

Credentials:B.A., University of South Carolina
M.A., University of Wisconsin (Madison)
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin (Madison)
Associated Departments:Museum and Heritage Studies
Email:sstevens@randolphcollege.edu

News Headlines

Since joining the faculty at Randolph College, I have combined my training as a Classical philologist specializing in Latin with my research as an archaeologist: I teach all levels of Latin language and literature, and courses in Mediterranean archaeology. I try to convey my enthusiasm for Latin as a window into the literature, culture and history of Rome as well as a foundation for learning other languages and developing better English. My archaeology courses emphasize the material culture and physical environment of the Roman world. I like collaborative work: team-teaching with my colleagues in the Art department and observing my Latin students teaching Latin to gifted third, fourth and fifth graders in Lynchburg has been a treat, and eye-opening too.

A specialist in the archaeology of North Africa, I have directed excavations at Carthage and Lamta (Tunisia) that included archaeological field schools for undergraduate students. The excavations resulted in the publication of numerous articles and three books to which current and former students have contributed. I have become especially concerned of late about archaeological and cultural heritage conservation, and have developed a summer course in Italy with conservator Roberto Nardi to get my students involved.

My fieldwork and other collaborative ventures lead me to encourage students to participate in excavations, conservation programs, interdisciplinary research and experiential learning on our campus and overseas. As a student of modern languages and a passionate advocate of overseas travel and study, I urge Classics majors to study in Rome, Athens, Reading University or elsewhere for a semester.

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