Randolph College Home Page Give Today! Support Randolph College
AboutAdmissionUndergraduateGraduateAcademicsUndergraduateGraduateStudent LifeAthleticsOutcomesAlumnae & AlumniParents & FamiliesInside RandolphAPPLYREQUESTVISITNEWSEVENTSSupport RandolphSearch

Chinese Studies

The growing importance of China as an economic power means that Chinese language skills and cultural knowledge are in increasing demand.

Why Pursue Chinese Studies at Randolph?

Randolph College offers students opportunities to gain spoken proficiency in Mandarin, as well as Chinese reading and writing skills.

Beyond providing four levels of Chinese language training, the College offers a number of courses that give insight into the Chinese culture, society, and politics.

Periodically, a travel-study course is offered that exposes students to the richness and variety of life in China.

Degrees offered

Chinese Studies interdisciplinary minor

Related Programs

Opportunities for Experience

Internships

The College has a distinctive Summer internship program which places selected students in positions with Energizer Holdings, Inc., located in Shanghai and presents them with an exceptional opportunity to gain first-hand experience in the Chinese business world.

The Career Development Center will help place you in positions with leading companies and organizations in your fields of study.

Learn more about internship opportunities.

Study Abroad

Spend a year or a semester studying, living, and learning abroad.  Broaden your perspective while gaining the skills you need to succeed in our global society.

Students can choose our affiliates in Japan, the United Kingdom or Spain, faculty-led Study Seminar trips, special programs through academic departments, or design their own experiences.

Learn more about Study Abroad.

Intercultural Competence

All Randolph students learn global citizenship with the capability to accurately understand and adapt to cultural differences and find commonality.

Chinese Studies minors must gain working knowledge of the Chinese language and a broad understanding of the modern political history, economy, diplomacy, and societies of China.

Symposium of Artists and Scholars

Modeled after a traditional academic conference, the SAS brings together students of all disciplines to share the results and highlights of the best work being produced at the College –  oral presentations, readings of creative works, performances, exhibitions of student artwork, and poster presentations.

Learn more about the Symposium of Artists and Scholars.

Model UN Team

In recent years, our student delegations to the National Model United Nations (NMUN) conference in New York City have consistently been honored among the best.

Participation is selective and chosen delegates take a full credit class to prepare.

Delegates learn the structure, systems, and history of the UN with an emphasis on writing, research, speaking, and collaboration.

Summer Research Program

Spend the summer working closely with a professor on a focused aspect of a topic of your choosing.

Randolph’s intensive eight-week Summer Research Program enables students to work with professors on a research of their own design; live in a residence hall on campus, participate in on-campus summer events, attend special seminars with guest speakers; and share the progress and results of their research.

Learn more about the Summer Research Program.

Unique Experiences

Outcomes

Historic Preservation Law

Janie Campbell ’12, history major
Preservation Consultant, law firm of Rogers Lewis Jackson Mann & Quinn, LLC, Columbia, South Carolina

Janie’s group works with developers seeking tax credits for rehabilitating historic properties.

“I work closely with project architects to ensure that historic, character defining elements of each building are preserved and restored, which can vary tremendously as what is significant to a 1929 airplane hangar is vastly different from what makes a 1963 mid-century modern motel unique!”

She writes National Register of Historic Places nominations and Historic Preservation Certification applications, which detail the property’s significance.  She also conducts site visits to ensure work is being completed as described and photographs the before, during, and after conditions of each project.

“Randolph certainly laid the foundation for my research and writing skills. The Summer Research Program, in particular, prepared me for the type of place-based research I do now. “

Opportunities

Top Ranked Professors

Randolph College’s faculty are consistently recognized as among the best in the nation. The Princeton Review ranked the College in the Top 25 for most accessible professors in the most recent edition of its flagship college guide, The Best 389 Colleges.

Randolph has been ranked in the top 25 for most accessible professors for more than a decade.

Chinese Studies Faculty

Kun An

Professor of Chinese

Read More... Kun An

Only at Randolph

Randolph students can take advantage of unique programs which give them a more enriching education than can be found anywhere else.

The Randolph Plan

Randolph students work with faculty mentors to explore a broad range of disciplines as they chart their academic path.

Learn More
TAKE2

Two courses per half-mester means you get to focus in and dig deep into your coursework while still having time for the rest of the college experience. Two classes. Seven weeks. Repeat.

Learn More
Money for Your Research

The Randolph Innovative Student Experience (RISE) program provides every student a $2,000 grant to fund research, creative work, experiential learning or other scholarly pursuits.

Learn More
The Liberal Arts Advantage

Randolph graduates learn to think critically, solve problems and work well with others. They are prepared to succeed in all aspects of life.

Learn More

Department News

W&L professor Yamhong Zhu to discuss ‘Supernatural Encounters: Tales of the Strange in Chinese Culture’ at Randolph

Zhu will discuss how supernatural encounters between human and otherworldly entities—think ghosts, demons, and fox spirits—are represented in Chinese culture and literature and adapted for film and TV in contemporary China.

Read More

Cale Holmes ’16 returning to Randolph to talk about his journalism career

Most recently, Holmes worked as a producer for CGTN, a state-run English-language news channel based in Beijing, China.

Read More

History major gets firsthand look at historic preservation through Nantucket internship

William Olichney ’24 spent six weeks at Preservation Institute Nantucket, an internship funded for a Randolph student each year by A.J. and Lynn Land ’60, this summer.

Read More

Scholar on Chinese politics to discuss ‘Human Rights in China’

Perry Link, a world-renowned scholar on modern Chinese literature, politics and intellectual life, will give a special lecture entitled “Human Rights […]

Read More

On Air Personality: Cale Holmes '16 has a passion for journalism

Cale Holmes ’16 pursues his passion for journalism On any given day, Cale Holmes ’16 could be asked to cover […]

Read More

W&L professor Yamhong Zhu to discuss ‘Supernatural Encounters: Tales of the Strange in Chinese Culture’ at Randolph

Zhu will discuss how supernatural encounters between human and otherworldly entities—think ghosts, demons, and fox spirits—are represented in Chinese culture and literature and adapted for film and TV in contemporary China.

Read More

Cale Holmes ’16 returning to Randolph to talk about his journalism career

Most recently, Holmes worked as a producer for CGTN, a state-run English-language news channel based in Beijing, China.

Read More

History major gets firsthand look at historic preservation through Nantucket internship

William Olichney ’24 spent six weeks at Preservation Institute Nantucket, an internship funded for a Randolph student each year by A.J. and Lynn Land ’60, this summer.

Read More

Scholar on Chinese politics to discuss ‘Human Rights in China’

Perry Link, a world-renowned scholar on modern Chinese literature, politics and intellectual life, will give a special lecture entitled “Human Rights […]

Read More

On Air Personality: Cale Holmes '16 has a passion for journalism

Cale Holmes ’16 pursues his passion for journalism On any given day, Cale Holmes ’16 could be asked to cover […]

Read More
Facebook Twitter Instagram LinkedIn YouTube RSS Feeds Snapchat
Department Chair

Kun An

Professor of Chinese

Credentials:B.A., Beijing Normal University
M.A., University of Pittsburgh
Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh
Associated Departments:Asian Studies, Chinese Studies
Office:Leggett 605
Phone:(434) 947-8558
Email:kan@randolphcollege.edu

I came to Randolph College from Princeton University, where I taught for five years. At Randolph, in addition to teaching four levels of Chinese language, and several China-related courses (film, culture, and literature), I like to practice the Five Routines of Soaring Crane Qigong and explore new way of cooking healthy Chinese food. I strive to help my language students sample authentic Chinese food, especially “weird” dishes – my belief is that motivation for high proficiency language skills comes from cravings and talking about good food.

As a teacher-researcher, I strive to research what I teach and use insight from my research to improve teaching and curriculum. My contributions to the field of second language acquisition and pedagogy, since 2007, have been primarily in the areas of (a) discourse analysis in elementary grammar acquisition; (b) computer-assisted learning in elementary tonal acquisition; (c) computer-assisted learning in Mandarin character acquisition; and (d) issues of teaching Chinese in Liberal Arts Colleges.

My publications include: Anything Goes: An Advanced Chinese Reader “无所不谈”, Princeton University Press, 2006; Sample Tests of English for College Students of Science, Beijing University of Technology Press, 1992; and New Edition of Listening Comprehension, Beijing Science and Technology Publishing House, 1991. I am currently editing two articles: “Grammar Development in Conversation: Revisiting Corrective Feedback within the Zone of Proximal Development” and “What Makes Learning Second Language Grammar Difficult? A Response to DeKeyser.”

×