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Art History & Studio Art

The art alumni of Randolph College find themselves with a variety of professional options after graduation, including careers in media, advertising, publishing, fashion, design, education, or the performing arts, and are prepared to work as professional artists or in museums and galleries.

A place to create

Imagine the inspiration of working in a studio with high ceilings and a glass wall providing a spectacular mountain view.

Or the connection with nature you get working in a painting studio that includes decks, terraces, and porches overlooking the Mabel K. Whiteside Greek Theatre (an outside natural theatre designed after the original Greek theatres).

Whether you’re painting, printmaking, or drawing, you’ll find that Randolph offers you outstanding facilities in which to create.

As a senior, you will have your own dedicated studio space available to you 24/7.

Degrees offered

Bachelor of Arts Degree in Art History

Bachelor of Arts Degree in Studio Art

Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree in Studio Art

Minor in Art History

Minor in Studio Art

Minor in Museum Studies

Curriculum and Courses

Program Overview

Visual literacy is critical to understanding our increasingly complex world and its images. Courses in the department provide a framework for the study of art through knowledge of its principles and history and through creative studio work, helping students develop critical and creative skills that prepare them for the demands of a changing marketplace.

In addition to stepping into jobs in a variety of fields, graduates have also gone on to degree programs in architecture, art history, art therapy, studio art, architectural preservation, and museum studies.

The Maier Museum of Art at Randolph College

A World Class Resource - Right on Campus​

Students have access to The Maier Museum of Art at Randolph College, which features work by American artists of the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries.

Built in 1952 by the National Gallery of Art as a repository for its collection in the event of war, it was renovated in 1977 and now displays the College’s remarkable collection of several thousand paintings, prints, drawings, and photographs.

The Museum hosts an active schedule of special exhibitions and education programs throughout the year, as well as internships, museum studies practicums, and class visits.

Learn more at www.maiermuseum.org.

Why Randolph

“My internship and job at the Maier Museum of Art gave me priceless experience that I use on a daily basis. It is where I got a year’s worth of hands-on experience in a museum, as well as where I conducted my research for the VAM conference at which I presented my research. It was at this conference that I met museum professionals with whom I networked until I got my internship at the Fredericksburg Area Museum."

Rachel Carder '17
Outreach Coordinator & Collections Assistant , Fredericksburg Area Museum

Unique Experiences

The National Gallery, London

A One of a Kind Partnership

Randolph is the only college or university in the United States that offers an internship at the National Gallery of Art, London.

Two students spend eight weeks of the summer learning museum work at one of the world’s greatest painting collections.

The partnership also brings high-level staff members of the National Gallery to campus for lectures and master classes with Randolph students.  

Learn more about the National Gallery, London internship program.

Art Department Faculty

Andrea Campbell

Professor of Art History

Read More... Andrea Campbell

Chris Cohen

Assistant Professor of Art

Read More... Chris Cohen

Lesley Shipley

Assistant Professor of Art History

Read More... Lesley Shipley

Art is Everywhere

The celebration of art is a tradition at Randolph.  Works by our alumni, faculty, and staff can be found throughout the campus – in the halls, public spaces, private offices, classrooms, on the front of buildings, secret gardens, and places you’d least expect.  Someday your creation may join them.

In the News

Randolph student leaves her mark in downtown Lynchburg

Davis '23, a psychology major with minors in art and sociology, is among a group of local artists chosen to revamp an alley in downtown Lynchburg. 

Read More

Randolph students create class zine for art history course

The project is a collaboration among the students in art history professor Lesley Shipley’s course Women, Art, Power.

Read More

110th Annual Exhibition of Contemporary Art features work of trailblazing Black artists Faith Ringgold and Aminah Robinson

"Storytellers: Faith Ringgold + Aminah Robinson" opens Oct. 1.

Read More

A story-driven approach: Emilie Bryant ’22 connects communities through museum work

Emilie Bryant '22 recently created interpretive materials for the Maier Museum of Art at Randolph College exhibition "Beyond the Sound: In Memory of Sandra Whitehead" last spring. She's continued her museum work with two internships this summer.

Read More

Sandra Whitehead Memorial Lecture to focus on history of documentary photography

Laura Katzman, a professor of art history at James Madison University, will examine the history of 20th century documentary photography […]

Read More

Randolph student leaves her mark in downtown Lynchburg

Davis '23, a psychology major with minors in art and sociology, is among a group of local artists chosen to revamp an alley in downtown Lynchburg. 

Read More

Randolph students create class zine for art history course

The project is a collaboration among the students in art history professor Lesley Shipley’s course Women, Art, Power.

Read More

110th Annual Exhibition of Contemporary Art features work of trailblazing Black artists Faith Ringgold and Aminah Robinson

"Storytellers: Faith Ringgold + Aminah Robinson" opens Oct. 1.

Read More

A story-driven approach: Emilie Bryant ’22 connects communities through museum work

Emilie Bryant '22 recently created interpretive materials for the Maier Museum of Art at Randolph College exhibition "Beyond the Sound: In Memory of Sandra Whitehead" last spring. She's continued her museum work with two internships this summer.

Read More

Sandra Whitehead Memorial Lecture to focus on history of documentary photography

Laura Katzman, a professor of art history at James Madison University, will examine the history of 20th century documentary photography […]

Read More
Randolph students create class zine for art history course
The project is a collaboration among the students in art history professor Lesley Shipley’s course Women, Art, Power.
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Andrea Campbell

Professor of Art History

Credentials:B.A., The American University
M.A., PhD., Rutgers State University of New Jersey

Associated Departments:Art History and Studio Art, Museum and Heritage Studies
Office:Leggett 536
Phone:434.947.8483
Email:acampbell@randolphcollege.edu

News Headlines

As an undergraduate in Washington, D.C., I had the opportunity to study original works of art at the National Gallery and was enthralled by their collection of Italian Renaissance art. Italian Renaissance art is now my specialty, and I teach a range of courses at Randolph including Ancient, Medieval, and Baroque art, as well as Museum Studies. The interdisciplinary approach that framed my undergraduate education in Renaissance Studies still informs my teaching and research, and some of my favorite classes are those I co-teach with colleagues, such as Masterworks of Greek and Roman Art, a course that combines the perspectives of archaeology and art history.

The study of art and the material of our cultural patrimony has never been more critical to our lives as citizens. My students learn how to reconstruct the original meaning of works of art and architecture while being encouraged to consider their roles as historians and challenged to pose new questions.  The skills gained in critical thinking and writing, in addition to the ability to read and discern meaning in our visual environment, are some of the powerful tools gained in the study of art history that serve our students well in all their future occupations.

I am dedicated to getting students in front of original works of art and take students on field trips to all sorts of museums, both in our area and in nearby cities such as Richmond and Washington. My favorite course culminates in a two-week study tour in Italy; it is a great joy for me to witness students experience the power of Italian art in a way that can never be matched in the classroom.

My research interests include fifteenth-century Sienese art and culture, the subject of a current book project, and issues of patronage and iconography in Venetian painting and sculpture, which will be explored in two future projects.

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Chris Cohen

Assistant Professor of Art

Credentials:B.A., Yale University
M.F.A., James Madison University
Associated Departments:Art and Art History, Art History and Studio Art
Office:Leggett 310
Phone:4349478486
Email:ccohen@randolphcollege.edu

News Headlines

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Lesley Shipley

Assistant Professor of Art History

Credentials:B.A., University of Maryland, College Park
M.F.A., American University
M.A., Bryn Mawr College
Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College
Associated Departments:Art History and Studio Art
Office:Leggett 533
Phone:4349478484
Email:lshipley@randolphcollege.edu

News Headlines

My research and teaching interests are in modern and contemporary art, with an emphasis on identity, feminism, activism, and abstraction in art since 1960. Currently, I am completing an article that examines the intersection of ethics and aesthetics in two installations by the contemporary Colombian artist Doris Salcedo. I’m also finalizing a paper on a series of reliefs by the American artist Lee Bontecou. I have presented my research at the Feminist Art History Conference, the Annual Conference of the College Art Association, the Asians in the Americas Conference, and the Association of Art Historians Annual Conference in Norwich, England.

At Randolph, I teach 19th-century European Art, Modern European Art, American Art and Architecture, and the second half of the survey of Western Art. Special topics that I plan to teach include “Race, Gender, and Sexuality in Contemporary Art”, “Art and Activism since 1960,” and “African American Art from Colonialism to the Present”.

I try to make the course material relevant to students and encourage them to develop their own perspectives on the subjects we investigate together. My approach to teaching stems from my belief in the power of students’ voices to co-construct the learning experience within the college classroom. This commitment to integrating student voice in the classroom closely aligns with my scholarly interests in issues of identity. I also have a graduate degree in fine arts and this training has furthered my commitment to keeping the work of art central to the study of art history. All of my courses take advantage of the resources at the Maier Museum of Art at Randolph College. The Maier’s outstanding collection and exhibitions make Randolph College an exceptional institution at which to study (and to teach!) the history of art.

When students complete my courses, I hope they are more confident in their abilities to ask important questions that are meaningful to them, to think and read critically and carefully, and to listen and look with a more open mind than when they arrived. These skills are relevant to all of the disciplines that they encounter in a liberal arts education and support a life-long love of learning. When I’m not teaching or writing, I enjoy painting and drawing, running, reading the New Yorker and cookbooks, traveling, and spending time with my family.

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