Danielle Currier

Women of Hogwarts: Danielle Currier to discuss feminism in Harry Potter universe at Roanoke magic festival

Danielle Currier

This weekend, sociology professor Danielle Currier will give the talk, “Fantastical, Feisty, Fearless, Flying, and Feminist: the Girls and Women of Hogwarts,” at the Generic Magic Festival in Roanoke, Virginia. Currier’s presentation is scheduled as part of the main festival on Saturday, October 6, at 3 p.m. at Greene Memorial United Methodist Church. The Generic... READ MORE >>

Activism Explained

Sociology professor Danielle Currier and Lisa White ’18 discuss their research.

When Lisa White ’18 chose to major in sociology at Randolph, she did it with her 14-year-old daughter in mind. Her child was also the inspiration for a Summer Research project she is conducting about feminism and activism. “This interests me because my daughter is African American and I want to fight for her rights... READ MORE >>

Randolph professors co-author chapter in new book on political messaging

Political Communication & Strategy Book

Vincent Vecera, a political science professor, and Danielle Currier, a sociology professor, have co-authored a chapter in the book, Political Communication & Strategy: Consequences of the 2014 Midterm Elections, which will be published by University of Akron Press this fall. The chapter was based off of Vecera’s research project, “The Social Construction of Women’s Interests... READ MORE >>

Sheldon wins Academic Smack Down for the sciences

Physics professor Peter Sheldon (center, left) shows off his championship belt.

As the crowd erupted in deafening cheers and chants of his name, physics professor Peter Sheldon accepted the championship belt as winner of Randolph’s first-ever Academic Smack Down Wednesday night. Sporting a lab coat and bringing his own robot, Sheldon represented the sciences in the playful debate between disciplines, which was designed to help students... READ MORE >>

Student researching sociocultural effect of mills

Danielle Currier (left) and Ayla Hagen '’18 visit the site of a Lynchburg mill that closed in the 1950s.

Inspired by the work of a former Randolph professor, Ayla Hagen ’18 is conducting a Summer Research project that examines the socioeconomic effect of mills on their surrounding communities. Hagen is following in the footsteps of John K. Morland, a Randolph professor who wrote Millways of Kent. The book describes the role of “Kent’s Mill,”... READ MORE >>