Give Today! Support Randolph College
About RandolphAdmissionAcademicsStudent LifeAthleticsOutcomesApplyDepositInquireVisitNewsEventsGiveA-Z IndexSearchAlumnae & AlumniParents & FamiliesInside Randolph

Course Offerings

Below is a list of available courses offered by the Psychology Department. Learn more about the Psychology curriculum and degree requirements.

Course List

PSYC 105 - INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

This course will survey basic principles of psychology. Topics include history of psychology, research methods, neuroscience and behavior, nature, nurture, development through the lifespan, thinking and language, psychological disorders, sensation and perception, states of consciousness, learning, memory, emotions, and social psychology. Additional topics could include motivation, personality, intelligence, health/stress, and therapy. Hours credit: 3.

PSYC 202 - PERSONALITY PSYCHOLOGY

The study of theories and research on individual differences and the sense of self. Readings and discussion focus on the major theoretical perspectives on the structure and development of human personality, and on methods for assessing individual differences. Cultural differences in theories of personality are considered, and current research studies on biological and environmental influences on personality are explored. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: PSYC 105R. Alternate years.

PSYC 205 - SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY

An introduction to the scientific study of social behavior. Traditional areas such as attitudes, aggressive and prosocial behavior, interpersonal attraction, person perception, and group dynamics are covered, as well as the application of social psychological research to contemporary social problems. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: Psychology 105R.

PSYC 208 - DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY

An overview of growth, maturation, and change in the human from conception through adolescence. The topics discussed include prenatal effects on the development of behavior, development of cognitive abilities in early childhood, and the effects of social interactions on development of personality and cognition. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: Psychology 105R or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 209 - SENSATION AND PERCEPTION

How do we come to learn about the world around us? How do we construct a conception of physical reality based on sensory experience? This course will cover the basic theories and methods of studying sensation and perception. The major emphasis is on vision and audition, although other modalities may be covered. Representative topics include receptor function and physiology, color, motion, depth, psychophysics of detection, perceptual constancies, adaptation, pattern recognition, and the interaction of knowledge and perception. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: PSYC 105. Alternate years.

PSYC 211 - COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY

This course is an introduction to human cognition and will cover how humans learn to deal with information from the environment. Students will concentrate on the classic topics including memory, attention, categorization, problem solving, language, reasoning, and decision making. Included is a discussion of the established theories and findings of cognitive psychology, how they relate to brain structure and functions, how these findings can be applied to real world problems, and how different methods of cognitive research can be used to understand mental processes. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: PSYC 105. Alternate years.

PSYC 212 - PSYCHOLOGY OF GENDER

Consideration of how gender is related to the way people think, feel, and act in the world, and how gender-related differences develop. Course will focus on theories, questions, methods, and findings of psychological research on gender and gender development. The role of gender will be studied in relation to gender roles, identity, child and adolescent development, sexuality, health (physical and mental), close relationships, family life, work (paid and unpaid), violence, and harassment. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: PSYC 105R or G ST 201. Offered alternate years.

PSYC 213 - PSYCHOLOGICAL DISORDERS

A survey of the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of the various forms of psychopathology, e.g., a comparison of the physiological and environmental explanations of depression and the implication of each of these explanations for treatment. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: Psychology 105R.

PSYC 227 - APPLIED STATISTICAL ANALYSIS IN PSYC

An introduction to statistical analysis as it is practiced in Psychology. Topics include sampling, descriptive statistics, statistical inference, and introduction to both nonparametric and parametric statistical tests. Students will also gain experience reading articles from the research literature. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: PSYC 105R or permission of the instructor. A student may receive credit for two of these courses: ECON 227, MATH 227, POL 231, PSYC 227, or SOC 395.

PSYC 228 - RESEARCH DESIGN & METHODOLOGY

Discussion of techniques used in psychological research. Topics include basic research designs, ethical research practices, the use of descriptive and inferential statistics within psychological research, drawing conclusions from results, and writing and reporting findings. Throughout the semester, students will develop an original research hypothesis and will write a research proposal in an APA-style paper. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: Psychology 105R and 227.

PSYC 230 - EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY

Students learn how to critically evaluate published psychological research from the major sub-divisions of the discipline, design and conduct experiments, analyze data using SPSS, and write research reports in APA style. Students design and carry out an experiment and present it in a conference-style presentation. This course is writing intensive. Psychology majors have priority registration. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite or corequisite: PSYC 228.

PSYC 251 - BIOLOGICAL BASES OF BEHAVIOR

This course presents a survey of the biological bases of human behaviors. The first part of the course consists of an introduction to structure and functions of the nervous system including the role of hormones in that function. The latter part of the course explores the application of those concepts to explanations of behavior with a special focus on humans. Credit hours: 3. Prerequisite: PSYC 105 or permission of the instructor. Alternate years.

PSYC 260 - LANGUAGE ACQUISITION AND DEVEL

This course will introduce students to the study of human language. Topics will include processes and theories of language development, as well as cognitive and neurological building blocks of language. Although emphasis will be placed on typical patterns of language development, we will also explore how language develops in other contexts (e.g. developmental disability, deafness, bilingual households). Credit hours: 3. Prerequisite: PSYC 105.

PSYC 286 - PSYC ONE TIME ONLY

Hours credit: 3. One time only.

PSYC 305 - RESEARCH IN PSYCHOLOGY

Each student works on a research project in conjunction with a faculty member in the department. Projects may be at any stage of the research process, including a review of the literature, study design, data collection, data entry and analysis, writing up the final results and preparing research for a presentation. Often these projects precede or continue a summer research project. The research time is supplemented by readings and individual conferences with the instructor. Credit hours: 1, 2, or 3. Open only to psychology majors in consultation with faculty. Individual conferences to be arranged. Prerequisite: PSYC 228R or permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of 9 hours. Sections might be offered on a Pass/Fail basis at the discretion of the instructor.

PSYC 316 - TESTING & MEASUREMENTS

This course explores the theory and practice of psychological assessment. Major topics include test construction and validation, with attention to statistical techniques; appropriate test use, including legal and ethical issues; and major tests for measuring mental abilities, achievement, personality, and psychopathology. Throughout the semester, students will develop and validate an original measurement tool and will report on their research in an APA-style paper. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: Psychology 228R. Offered alternate years.

PSYC 325 - PSYCHOLOGY OF MUSIC

In this course, students will explore the ways that music engages the mind, brain, and body. The course will function as a seminar, with students reading research articles from the fields of music cognition, cognitive science, neuroscience, and developmental psychology. Students will understand and evaluate behavioral science methods used in research and integrate content with their own musical experiences. Credit hours: 3. Prerequisites: PSYC 227 or permission of instructor

PSYC 330 - HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY

A study of psychological influences on health, illness, coping, stress, pain, and health-related behaviors. Discussion of how health is related to attitudes, emotions, personality, and social support. A focus on health-enhancing and health-compromising behaviors will allow students to develop and implement a personal health behavior modification program. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: PSYC 228R or permission of instructor. Offered alternate years.

PSYC 334 - THINK & REASON PSYCHOLOG SCI

We are all necessarily consumers of psychological research. This course focuses on the skills that students need to critically evaluate scientific research. Students learn to analyze primary source articles, to identify strengths in weaknesses in research design, and more importantly, extrapolate from study results to draw conclusions regarding research findings. This includes discussing how study results generalize to other areas in psychology, and to other fields of study, such as law, educational settings, medical practice, and ethics. The course also focuses on building arguments, assessing the validity of assumptions, and understanding how historical schools of thought have influenced both scientific questions asked and how scientists have interpreted the answers. In order to accomplish these goals, the class studies a variety of historical and contemporary myths and controversies in the field of psychology, examining the research that gave rise to and/or refutes the myths and controversies, ending with a study of the current Open Science movement in psychology. Credit hours: 3. Prerequisite: PSYC 228R or permission of instructor. Alternate years.

PSYC 338 - COG NEUROSCIENCE

This course explores the link between processes of mind and brain. The class will investigate how scientists utilize current technologies to understand the neuronal activity and anatomy of the brain that supports perception, memory storage, and recall, among other topics. Students will read and evaluate scientific sources and compare those findings to one popular culture depiction of a mind - zombies. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: PSYC 228R or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 341 - EVOLUTIONARY PSYCHOLOGY

An examination of how the processes of evolution have influenced the development of human thinking and behaviors. Exploration may include the study of reproductive behaviors, parental behaviors, aggression, altruism, emotional expression, language, and others. The course will be conducted primarily as a seminar and include readings from popular press texts, theoretical scholarly articles, and original reports of research results. Hours Credit: 3. Prerequisite: PSYC 228 or permission of instructor.

PSYC 343 - PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY

This course presents a look at the ways that drugs can affect behavior. The course will include an in depth review of neurotransmission including neurotransmitter systems and functions of the synapse. The effects of both recreational drugs and psychotherapeutic drugs on those systems will be presented along with discussion of behavioral consequences of using those drugs. Primary source readings will be used to explore the methodology of research in this area. Historical and contemporary social and medical policy for use and misuse of these drugs will also be considered. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: PSYC 228. Alternate years.

PSYC 351 - HISTORY OF PSYCHOLOGY

This course addresses the roots of modern psychological thought and methodology, from their origins in philosophy and the natural sciences through the refinements of psychology in its current form. In addition to learning about the major schools of psychology, e.g., Behaviorism, Psychoanalysis, students will explore how cultural forces shape psychological theories and the experiences of the people who develop them. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: twelve hours in psychology and junior standing or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 361 - ADVANCED TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY

Exploration of a focused research area of psychology through primary source readings and discussion. Topics will vary from year to year. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: PSYC 228.

PSYC 385 - PSYC ONE TIME ONLY

Hours credit: 3. One time only.

PSYC 385L - PSYC ONE TIME ONLY

Hours credit: 1. One time only.

PSYC 386 - PSYC ONE TIME ONLY

Hours credit: 3. One time only.

PSYC 388 - PSYC ONE TIME ONLY

Hours credit: 3. One time only.

PSYC 486 - PSYC ONE TIME ONLY

Hours Credit: 3. One time only.

PSYC 493 - SENIOR SEMINAR

This seminar is focused on supporting development and execution of a senior research project. Supporting assignments include discussion of issues in contemporary psychology, research ethics, methodology, and style of presentation for psychological research. During the first semester each student, in consultation with faculty, develops a proposal for a research project in a chosen area of psychology. These projects are carried out during the second semester and are presented both in an American Psychological Association style research paper and orally to the seminar. Students present the results of their research at a regional conference. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: Psychology 228R, 229L, or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 494 - SENIOR SEMINAR

This seminar is focused on supporting development and execution of a senior research project. Supporting assignments include discussion of issues in contemporary psychology, research ethics, methodology, and style of presentation for psychological research. During the first semester each student, in consultation with faculty, develops a proposal for a research project in a chosen area of psychology. These projects are carried out during the second semester and are presented both in an American Psychological Association style research paper and orally to the seminar. Students present the results of their research at a regional conference. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: Psychology 228R, 229L, or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 497H - HONORS IN THE MAJOR

PSYC 498H - HONORS IN THE MAJOR

Facebook Twitter Instagram LinkedIn YouTube RSS Feeds Snapchat