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Course Listing

Below is a list of available courses offered by the Philosophy Department. Consult the Registrar’s Office and the College Catalog for registration information.

PHIL 122 - EARLY MODERN PHILOSOPHY
Reading and discussion of selections from Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. Hours credit: 3.

PHIL 132 - INTRO PHIL: KNOWLEDGE & REALITY
An introduction to philosophy through reading classical and contemporary authors on traditional issues. Topics will be selected from among the following: reason and religious belief, the grounds and limit of knowledge, mind and its place in nature, determinism and free will, and the meaning of life. Hours credit: 3. Offered first semester.

PHIL 133 - INTRO PHIL: ETHICS AND PUBLIC LIFE
An introduction to philosophical thinking about morality and human nature. Readings address concrete issues such as world hunger, capital punishment, and pornography, as well as theoretical topics such as human happiness, the nature of right and wrong, and the relationship between morality and law. Hours credit: 3.

PHIL 175 - PRACTICAL REASONING
An introduction to the practice of reasoning and problem-solving. Emphasis on the analysis of arguments of the sort encountered in everyday discourse and in textbooks and lectures; on the clear and persuasive presentation of arguments, reports, and papers; and on the refinement of ordinary critical instinct. Identical with Communication 175. Hours credit: 3. Offered second semester.

PHIL 177 - CLASSICAL PHILOSOPHY
An introduction to ancient Greek philosophy. Topics include metaphysics, human nature, happiness, ethics, friendship, and political order. Readings will be selected from the pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle, and others. Identical with Classics 177. Hours credit: 3

PHIL 183 - FAITH AND DOUBT
Identical with Religion 183. Hours credit: 3.

PHIL 214 - BIOETHICS
A careful analysis of issues arising in medical practice and research. Topics include abortion, euthanasia, surrogate parenting, allocation of scarce resources, cloning, experimentation, and the doctor/patient relationship. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: PHIL 133 or permission of the instructor.

PHIL 230 - LOGIC
An introduction to formal logic covering truth-functions and quantification with identity. Attention is given to the nature of proof in formal theories and to the evaluation of arguments in natural language. There is a brief treatment of the decidability, soundness, and completeness of systems of logic. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or Philosophy 175. Offered first semester.

PHIL 275 - TRUE RELIGION
Identical with Religion 275. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

PHIL 280 - PHILOSOPHY OF ART
A critical analysis of the views of philosophers and artists on issues such as the definition of art, the nature of artistic inspiration, the relation between art and craft, the social function of art, aesthetic judgment, interpretation, and the relation of art and morality. Identical with Art 280. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

PHIL 331 - EXISTENTIALISM & CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY
An advanced study of central ideas in European Continental philosophy from the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, including works by Hegel, Nietzsche, Schopenhauer, Husserl, Heidegger, and Sartre. Topics include the nature of the human condition, human subjectivity and freedom, authenticity and bad faith, and the ontological significance of anxiety. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: PHIL 133 or PHIL/RELG 183. Alternate years.

PHIL 351 - PHILOSOPHY OF MIND
An advanced study of the views of contemporary philosophers on the mind and its place in nature. Topics include the mind-body problem, consciousness, and the problem of other minds. Students will also reflect on the relationship between scientific and philosophical investigation of the mind. The nature of representation, free will, concepts, emotions, perception, and the self may also be discussed. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: six hours of philosophy and/or psychology (excluding PSYC 227).

PHIL 361 - ENVIRONMENTAL PHILOSOPHY
An advanced study of ethical and aesthetic issues concerning the environment. Topics include attitudes toward nature; the moral standing of animals, plants, species, and eco-systems; the tension between environmental preservation and economic development; the right of property owners to exploit natural resources; and, the value of wilderness. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: Philosophy 133 or 214 or EVST 102 or permission of the instructor. Offered alternate years.

PHIL 375 - PHILOSOPHY OF LANGUAGE
A study of the relation of language to the world. The focus of the course is the analysis of meaning, reference, and truth. These analyses provide a framework for understanding how both communication and confusion can occur in the use of language. Identical with Communication 375. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: three semester hours in philosophy or permission of the instructor. Offered second semester.

PHIL 376 - TOPICS IN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY
Identical with Political Science 376. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: junior standing.

PHIL 493 - SEMINAR I
Detailed study and discussion of the work of a major philosopher, selected according to the interests and needs of the students enrolled. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: Philosophy 122;133;177; and 230.

PHIL 494 - SEMINAR II
Detailed study and discussion of a problem or topic in contemporary philosophy, selected according to the interests and needs of the students enrolled. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: Philosophy 122;133;177; and 230.

PHIL 497H - HONORS IN THE MAJOR

PHIL 498H - HONORS IN THE MAJOR