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Course Listing

Below is a list of available courses offered by the English Department. Consult the Registrar’s Office and the College Catalog for registration information.

ENGL 101 - ENGLISH COMPOSITION I
Detailed instruction in language usage and writing techniques for students whose native language is not English. Students placed in English 101 are also required to take English 102. Hours credit: 3. By placement only.

ENGL 102 - ENGLISH COMPOSITION II
Detailed instruction in language usage and writing techniques for students whose native language is not English. Students placed in English 101 are also required to take English 102. Hours credit: 3. By placement only.

ENGL 103 - WRITING IN COLLEGE
An introduction to writing at the college level, with attention to using English correctly and effectively, thinking analytically, identifying audiences, finding and evaluating source materials, developing an arguable thesis and supporting it with evidence, and using disciplinary conventions for citation and documentation. Guided practice in generating, revising, and editing drafts of essays. Hours credit: 3. This course cannot be taken on a Pass/Fail basis.

ENGL 111 - WRITING WOMEN
"Why are there no great women writers?" Virginia Woolf pondered in 1929 in order to examine and challenge the historical and cultural constraints on women's creativity and artistic production. This course explores selected poetry, fiction, and essays by women who have written - brilliantly - in spite of, out of, and/or from within those constraints. Thematic topics may vary by semester (examples include "Women Writing Romance" and "Science/Fiction"). Emphasis on critical approaches to literature and the writing of literary analysis. Hours credit: 3.

ENGL 112 - SPORTS LITERATURE
Walt Whitman said of baseball, it "belongs as much to our institutions, fits into them as significantly as our constitutions." This course examines sports as subject for both analytical and imaginative writing. Students read works that present an American identity through sport, the tension between being self-reliant and playing for the team; or, as Whitman would have it, "the snap, go, fling of the American atmosphere." Hours credit: 3. Alternate years.

ENGL 113 - INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE
Emphasis on critical approaches to literature and the writing of literary analysis. Topic changes from year to year. Hours credit: 3. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. Offered second semester.

ENGL 142 - F. SCOTT & ZELDA
How did a disorganized college student become a world-class novelist? This course traces the development of F. Scott Fitzgerald's art through the wide range of his writing, including fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama. Attention will be given to his collaboration and competition with Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald, as well as to relevant cultural phenomena such as media celebrity and the rise of Hollywood. Hours credit: 3. Alternate years

ENGL 156 - PULP FICTION
Considering classics like Homer's Odyssey and the tales of the Arabian Nights, this course will examine how sensational literature has evolved into a mass-market genre. Emphasis will be placed on twentieth-century examples of fantasy, detection, romance, and adventure. Authors may include Edgar Rice Burroughs, Raymond Chandler, Ian Fleming, Stephen King, and Jacqueline Susann. Hours credit: 3. Alternate years

ENGL 167 - EXPLORING THE CREATIVE WRITING PROCESS
An introduction to the writing of poetry and fiction, taught by the Emerging Writer-in-Residence. Hours credit: 1. First-year students have registration priority. Offered on a Pass/Fail basis only. Offered second semester.

ENGL 240 - ESL TEACHING METHODS
This course will help students who are considering teaching English to speakers of other languages develop a theoretical framework, explore methods of teaching and then learn to plan effective lessons based on principles they can discuss and defend. Students will learn to evaluate materials for teaching and testing and to use the various resouces (such as conferences, journals, websites) available for ESL (English as a Second Language) teachers. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

ENGL 253 - READING POETRY
A study of lyric, narrative, and dramatic verse. Students will discover meaning by examining the formal properties of poetry, including meter, diction, imagery, and tone. Readings will include a range of genres such as epic, elegy, pastoral, and ode. Representative authors may include Spenser, Milton, Wordsworth, Whitman, and Dickinson. Hours credit: 3.

ENGL 255 - READING PROSE
A study of non-fiction prose, including autobiography, intellectual essay, reportage, criticism, and literary theory. Students will investigate the boundaries of critical thinking and creative imagination; of fact, fiction, and truth. Representative authors may include Aristotle, Montaigne, Douglass, Hazlitt, and Woolf. Hours credit: 3.

ENGL 256 - READING FICTION
A study of the short story and the novel with particular attention given to form and technique. Students will explore a variety of narrative types such as picaresque, epistolary, naturalistic, satiric, and experimental. Representative authors may include Voltaire, Austen, Twain, Joyce, García Márquez, and Walker. Hours credit: 3.

ENGL 261 - INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING
The writing of poetry, fiction, and plays, focusing upon group discussion of student work. The work of modern and contemporary authors will be used as models for discussions of theme, theory, and technique. Hours credit: 3.

ENGL 263 - INTERMEDIATE POETRY WRITNG
Intensive work in the writing of poetry. Reading of theory along with examples from contemporary poets as models. Primary focus on the workshopping of students' poems. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: English 261R.

ENGL 265 - INTERMEDIATE CREATIVE NONFICTION
Intensive work in the writing of creative nonfiction. Reading of theory along with examples from contemporary writers as models. Primary focus on the workshopping of students' essays. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: ENGL 261R.

ENGL 266 - INTERMEDIATE FICTION WRITING
Intensive work in the writing of fiction. Reading of theory along with examples from contemporary fiction writers as models. Primary focus on workshopping of students' stories. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: English 261R.

ENGL 267 - CREATIVE WRITING SPECIAL TOPICS
The theory and practice of writing poetry, short fiction, plays, or creative non-fiction. Hours credit: 1. Prerequisite: ENGL 261R and/or permission of the English Department. Majors and minors have registration priority. Offered on a Pass/Fail basis only. May be repeated for credit.

ENGL 274 - ANCIENT POETRY IN TRANSLATION
A survey of the major genres of ancient Greek and Roman poetry, including epic, lyric, drama, and satire. Texts will be read in English translation. Hours credit: 3.0. Prerequisite: ENGL 103, ENGL 113, or permission of the department. One time only.

ENGL 276 - READING DRAMA
A study of tragedy, comedy, and other varieties of works for the theatre, with attention given to historical and social context. Students will examine periods such as the Restoration, types such as melodrama, and movements such as theatre of the absurd. Attendance at screenings and at live productions by the theatre department may be required. Representative authors may include Sophocles, Behn, Ibsen, Shaw, and O'Neill. Hours credit: 3.

ENGL 277 - SHAKESPEARE
An introductory course dealing with the principles of Renaissance stagecraft, the nature of performance, the construction and themes of the plays, and the concept of genre or type. Representative plays in all genres from throughout Shakespeare’s career. Identical with Theatre 277. Hours credit: 3.

ENGL 279 - INTERMEDIATE PLAYWRITING
In this course, students learn how to structure a scene, how to structure a play, how to create, hold, and release the tension of a dramatic moment through taut and convincing dialogue, how to create characters that an audience will identify with and care about. Through the reading of modern and contemporary plays, both short and full length, students will study the ways that highly accomplished playwrights solve the problems presented by a variety of dramatic situations, and will begin to implement into their own scenes and plays the elements of the craft that they discover. Identical with Theatre 279. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: ENGL 261R or THTR 142 or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 301 - MEDIEVAL LITERATURE
Medieval life and culture as reflected in British and Continental works. Authors may include Wolfram, Chretien, Dante, Malory, and Chaucer. Attention is also given to art and architecture. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: 100- or 200-level literature course or permission of the instructor. Offered alternate years.

ENGL 307 - SEVENTEENTH CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE
For Fall 2013, "V for Vendetta:" the tumultuous seventeenth century The Gunpowder Plot and Afterwards: the governing elite versus two gifted but politically obtuse monarchs; the Metaphysical poets (Donne and his heirs), with their emphasis on highly ingenious individuality, versus the Cavaliers (Jonson and his "sons"), with their emphasis on poised social consciousness; the spectacular, allegorical, and very expensive Court masques versus the offerings of the public theatres such as the Globe; and above all, the commanding figure of John Milton, political revolutionary and epic poet. A period of dazzling achievement in the arts, and of great significance in politics, since in some respects the American and French revolutions were both grounded in the lessons of the English Civil War. Hours credit: 3. Prequisite: 100 or 200-level literature course or permission of the instructor. Offered alternate years.

ENGL 309 - BECOMING U.S.
An historical survey of colonial, Native American, and early national expression that shows - and often shapes - the development of a distinctive U.S. literary identity by the early nineteenth century. Authors may include Bradford, Byrd, Tecumseh, Wheatley, Foster, C. B. Brown, and Irving. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: 100- or 200-level literature course or permission of the instructor. Rotating.

ENGL 312 - NINETEENTH-CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE
Romanticism and the formation of modern secular consciousness, 1798-1914. Attention will be given to the Romantic poets and their successors (especially Wordsworth and Keats, Arnold and Tennyson); to developments in the novel; to topics such as the rise of feminism or the decay of religious faith; and to Romanticism in art and music (Constable and Turner; Beethoven, Elgar, Vaughan-Williams). Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: 100- or 200-level literature course or permission of the instructor. Offered alternate years.

ENGL 320 - TWENTIETH CENT BRITISH & AMERICAN POETRY
The major movements in poetry written in the English language during the twentieth century. Reading will include criticism and theory. Emphasis on discussion and written analysis. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: 100- or 200-level literature course or permission of the instructor. Offered alternate years.

ENGL 323 - THE U.S. NOVEL
A study of the novel in the United States that ranges from its undistinguished beginnings in seduction-and-incest “potboilers” to its eventual achievements in world-class literature. The course focuses on issues of narrative design, literary developments distinctive to the U.S., and the cultural work of fiction. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: 100 or 200 level literature course or permission of the instructor. Rotating.

ENGL 328 - BEATS & HIPPIES
An examination of post-World War II American literature, focusing on the works of alienation and rebellion by such writers as Kerouac, Ginsberg, Burroughs, Kesey, and Brautigan. Attention is given to the influences of American Romanticism and European Existentialism on this counter-culture literature. The new and gonzo journalism of Tom Wolfe and Hunter S. Thompson will also be explored. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisites: 100- or 200-level literature course or permission of the instructor. Alternate years.

ENGL 331 - TOPICS IN LITERATURE
The work in the course varies from year to year. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: 100- or 200-level literature course or permission of the instructor. May be repeated for credit when topic differs.

ENGL 333 - LITERATURE OF THE AMERICAN SOUTH
A seminar-style, topically-arranged investigation of prose, poetry, and drama of the southern United States through selections from four centuries of Anglophone writing in the region. Topics (e.g. The African-American South, The Southern Renascence, Quintessential Faulkner, (Re)Constructions of the Old South, Belles and Ladies and Not) will vary. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: 100- or 200-level literature course or permission of the instructor. Rotating

ENGL 335 - EMERSON'S CONCORD CIRCLE
In Concord, Massachusetts, 1845, Thoreau built a house by Walden Pond on Emerson's land, Hawthorne wrote stories in the Old Manse, and Louisa May Alcott grew up with "little women" at Hillside. Students will examine this literary circle, along with writers it influenced, including Fuller, Melville, and Whitman, whose Leaves of Grass Emerson called "the most extraordinary piece of wit and wisdom that America has yet contributed." Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: 100- or 200-level literature course or permission of the instructor. Alternate years

ENGL 336 - INSPIRED BY THE SEA
An exploration of the maritime imagination that proceeds from the sea as setting, subject, and figure to transnational notions of "sea consciousness" that challenge traditions of geopolitical "mapping" in literary and cultural studies. Texts will be selected from a range of ancient and modern writers such as Virgil, Columbus, Equiano, Melville, Conrad, and Carson. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: 100- or 200-level literature course or permission of the instructor. Rotating

ENGL 337 - CIVIL WARS
A seminar in the literature of three elemental political conflicts in the mid-nineteenth century United States: the battle for African-American freedom, the crusade for women's rights, and the literal Civil War. The texts will be selected from the work of such writers as Alcott, Simms, DeForest, A. J. Evans, Fitzhugh, and W. W. Brown. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: 100- or 200-level literature course or permission of the instructor. Rotating

ENGL 341 - AUTHOR, AUTHOR!
The work in this course varies from year to year. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: 100- or 200-level literature course or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 342 - POE, POE, POE!
Inventor of the detective story, master of the macabre, arbiter of literary taste, Mr. Edgar Allan Poe is alive and well in our literary world. Students will read Poe's fiction, poetry, and prose and then study how a 1950s philosophical debate about "The Purloined Letter" sparked a critical firestorm. In more recent years, writers have "solved" the murder of Poe's "Marie Rogêt" and the mystery of Poe's own death. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: 100- or 200-level literature course or permission of the instructor. Rotating

ENGL 346 - FAULKNER & MORRISON
Arguably the greatest American novelists of the twentieth century, William Faulkner and Toni Morrison write from opposite ends of that period: he from the segregated South of pre-WWII, she from the empowered culture of post-civil rights and -feminist turmoil. Yet each has the same concern: depicting identity in a land of racial conflict. Provocative Pairings: The Sound and the Fury & The Bluest Eye; Absalom, Absalom! & Beloved; and Sanctuary & Jazz. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: 100 or 200 level literature course or permission of the instructor. Rotating.

ENGL 351 - GENRE STUDIES
The work in this course varies from year to year. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: 100- or 200-level literature course or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 352 - THE ROMANCE
The term romance originally meant a lengthy narrative made up of many adventures. During the European Middle Ages this genre flourished in French, German, and English, acquiring a twin emphasis on martial deeds and the pursuit of love. Later, Cervantes parodied it, Hawthorne defended it, and by the twentieth century it had become a highly formulaic kind of writing, exclusively about love. This course will examine a variety of romances from Longus to David Lodge. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: 100- or 200-level literature course or permission of the instructor

ENGL 353 - SATIRE
A study of writers who ridicule the status quo not only for our amusement but also for our improvement. Attention given to irony, wit, and lampoon. Readings from canonical satirists such as Juvenal, Swift, Twain, Huxley, Parker, and Ellison are complemented by Kubrick's Dr. Strangelove, Trudeau's Doonesbury, and The Colbert Report. The Onion, "America's Finest News Source," provides online late-breaking news. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: 100- or 200-level literature course or permission of the instructor. Rotating.

ENGL 357 - RADICAL TURNS
Just before the turns of the 19th and 20th centuries, the vogues of Gothicism and Naturalism, respectively, featured radical imaginations that shocked readers and redefined the terms of literature. Works by British and U.S. writers will provide a study of the phenomenon of creative extremity, as well as its influence and enduring power. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: 100- or 200-level literature course or permission of the instructor. Rotating

ENGL 363 - ADVANCED CREATIVE WRITING
A workshop in the writing of poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, or playwriting. Students may pursue the genre(s) of their choice. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: ENGL 261R and two of the following: ENGL 263; 266; ENGL/THTR 279; or permission of the instructor. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of nine hours.

ENGL 364 - FEMINIST LITERARY THEORY
This course provides an introduction to feminist literary criticism/theory. It also examines the ways that this strand of criticism overlaps, influences, and expands other fields of literary criticisms, including (among others) Marxist theory, queer theory, cultural studies, post-colonial theory, psychoanalytic theory, and new historicism. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: 100- or 200-level literature course or permission of the instructor. Rotating

ENGL 376 - RENAISSANCE DRAMA:MURDER&MADNESS
This course focuses on the drama of the Elizabethan and Jacobean eras, with special emphasis paid to theatrical spaces: geographical location and physical properties, audience composition, performance practices, and the aesthetic, economic, and political contexts of the productions. Identical with Theatre 376. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: 100- or 200-level literature course or permission of the instructor. Offered alternate years.

ENGL 378 - GENDER IN RENAISSANCE ART & LITERATURE
This course seeks to understand, analyze, and interpret representations of gender and sex within Renaissance art and literature (in both England and Italy). Using contemporary texts when possible and readings from the disciplines of literature, social history, feminist theory, and art historical texts, the course aims for a fuller assessment of gendered Renaissance life as it pertains to art and literature. Identical with Art 378. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 381 - ABSURD YOUNG MEN
Albert Camus proposes that man desires order in a world of chaos, leading to the absurd predicament. Question: whether to be angry about the human condition or, as Camus imagines Sisyphus, happy? Students will examine this existential paradox through the post-World War II dramas of playwrights such as Osborne, Pinter, Beckett, Ionesco, and Albee. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: 100- or 200-level literature course or permission of the instructor. Rotating

ENGL 390 - INDEPENDENT STUDY

ENGL 490 - INDEPENDENT STUDY

ENGL 493 - SENIOR SEMINAR
A course designed to help develop critical perspectives in literature. The aim is to increase understanding of such key concepts as genre, period, school, and critical approach. The course will require both essays and oral presentations. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: permission of the Department.

ENGL 494 - SENIOR PAPER
Each student will work closely with a faculty supervisor to prepare a major paper of about 25 pages. At the end of the semester, faculty and students will meet as a group to hear oral presentations of the students' work. Hours credit: 3. Prerequisite: ENGL 493 and permission of the Department.

ENGL 497H - HONORS IN THE MAJOR

ENGL 498H - HONORS IN THE MAJOR