History

Ragosta returns to Randolph as visiting history professor

John Ragosta

Longtime lawyer turned college professor, John Ragosta is returning to Randolph College as a visiting assistant professor in history for the 2016-17 academic year. Ragosta is serving as a sabbatical replacement for John d’Entremont, the Theodore H. Jack Professor of History—a role he also filled during the 2009-10 academic year. This fall, he is teaching... READ MORE >>

Thayer Lecture speaker to discuss WWI’s influence on women

Thayer Lecture poster

Randolph College’s annual Philip Thayer Memorial Lecture will examine the importance of World War I in shaping history as well as its influence and effect on the lives of women. Susan R. Grayzel will present the lecture, “Did Women Have a Great War?” on Tuesday, Feb. 9, at 7:30 p.m. in Wimberly Recital Hall (Presser... READ MORE >>

Survivor of Holocaust twin experiments shares message of forgiveness at Randolph

Eva Kor

Holocaust survivor Eva Mozes Kor has seen the darkest side of human nature. At Randolph on Tuesday, however, she shed some light on the power of forgiveness in even the most extreme circumstances. A native of Romania, Kor and her family were sentenced by the Nazis to the Auschwitz concentration camp in 1944. The 10-year-old... READ MORE >>

Survivor of Holocaust twin experiments to speak at Randolph

Eva Kor

Randolph College is partnering with the Holocaust Education Foundation of Central Virginia to host two special programs this month featuring Eva Mozes Kor, a Holocaust survivor, author, and internationally recognized forgiveness and human rights advocate. Kor is a native of Romania whose family was sentenced by the Nazis to the Auschwitz death camp in 1944.... READ MORE >>

Descendants of Thomas Jefferson discuss race relations with Randolph students

Gayle Jessup White (right) and Tess Taylor discuss racial issues in America during Randolph's Relatives and Strangers program Wednesday.

On Wednesday night, two descendants of U.S. President and Founding Father Thomas Jefferson challenged Randolph students to help improve race relations in America. The panel discussion was hosted by Randolph College and Thomas Jefferson’s Poplar Forest as part of its formal partnership. The discussion was part of a two-night program featuring cousins Gayle Jessup White,... READ MORE >>

Historic marker dedicated in memory of College artist

From left are Cleveland Porter, Jr., Randolph President Bradley W. Bateman, Robert Morgan Kash, and Thomas Upshur (seated).

The Randolph College and Lynchburg communities celebrated the life and achievements of Georgia Weston Morgan, a famed Lynchburg artist and member of the Class of 1903 who studied painting, in a dedication ceremony for a historic marker erected in her memory Sunday. Morgan also studied at the Academie Julian in Paris, France. She chaired the... READ MORE >>

Randolph, Poplar Forest partner to host Relatives and Strangers programs

Relatives and strangers

Americans take pride in their nation’s ethnic diversity, and it is impossible to imagine the United States without it. Yet simultaneously, America remains tormented by racial division, misunderstanding and alienation. Despite centuries of casual and intimate intermingling, white and black Americans are both relatives and strangers. On November 3 and 4, Thomas Jefferson’s Poplar Forest... READ MORE >>

Randolph students roll over history in Nelson County

Professor Sarah Sojka, Sara Woodward '16, and Hagay Haut '16 speak with other volunteers in the archaeology project at the site of the uncovered jailhouse.

Hagay Haut ’16 spent a recent afternoon lugging what looked like a suitcase across a garden in Nelson County. Occasionally stepping on turnips and ducking through the wires of a surrounding fence, he used the Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) to search for clues that there was more than just vegetables buried beneath the soil. Haut... READ MORE >>

Student researching sociocultural effect of mills

Danielle Currier (left) and Ayla Hagen '’18 visit the site of a Lynchburg mill that closed in the 1950s.

Inspired by the work of a former Randolph professor, Ayla Hagen ’18 is conducting a Summer Research project that examines the socioeconomic effect of mills on their surrounding communities. Hagen is following in the footsteps of John K. Morland, a Randolph professor who wrote Millways of Kent. The book describes the role of “Kent’s Mill,”... READ MORE >>

Summer Research takes student on a trip down memory lane

History professor Gerry Sherayko and Samantha Strickler '’17 visit the old Jones Memorial Library building on Rivermont Avenue.

Samantha Strickler ’17 is happiest in a room full of books and historical documents. Thanks to her Summer Research project, the history major from Luray, Virginia, feels like she is spending the eight weeks of the program in paradise. Strickler and history professor Gerry Sherayko have spent the summer flipping through pages of old Lynchburg... READ MORE >>