Faculty Scholarship

Gauthier to help the public ‘Decipher the News’ at Lynchburg Public Library

Jennifer Gauthier

Communication studies professor Jennifer Gauthier will present the lecture “Deciphering the News” at Lynchburg Public Library on Thursday, September 20, at 6 p.m. The event will be held in the Community Meeting Room. Gauthier’s talk is designed to help Lynchburg citizens identify fake news, sort out fact from opinion, and cut through misleading rhetoric to hone in what... READ MORE >>

Bessenger visits Bhutan for research on Tibetan Buddhist religious biographies

Professor Suzanne Bessenger in front of Tiger’s Nest Monastery in Paro, Bhutan

This summer, religious studies professor Suzanne Bessenger traveled to Bhutan for research on the role of non-monastic Buddhist practices described in the 14th Century biographies of the female saint Sönam Peldren and her husband and scribe, Rinchen Pel. Bessenger consulted Tshering Dhendup, dean of academic affairs at the College of Language and Culture Studies in... READ MORE >>

Penn’s research published in Communications in Algebra

Michael Penn

Randolph mathematics professor Michael Penn recently co-authored a paper that was published in the academic journal, Communications in Algebra. The article is entitled “Z/2Z Invariants of the Free Fermion Algebra” and details the uncovering of an interesting connection between orbifolds of free field vertex algebras and affine W-algebras. Read the article in its entirety here.... READ MORE >>

Rumore published in top immunology research journal

Amanda Rumore

Randolph biology professor Amanda Rumore co-authored a paper that was published in Frontiers in Immunology, which is one of the top academic journals in the field. The article is titled “Innate Immunity Induced by the Major Allergen Alt a 1 from the Fungus Alternaria is Dependent Upon Toll-like Receptors 2/4 Lung Epithelial Cells” and was... READ MORE >>

Deetz published in Smithsonian magazine

Kelley Deetz

An article by Kelley Deetz, visiting professor of sociology, was recently published in Smithsonian magazine. In the article, “How Enslaved Chefs Helped Shape American Cuisine,” Deetz writes about the history of African American chefs and enslaved cooks in the United States. She also recently published the book, Bound to the Fire: How Virginia’s Enslaved Cooks... READ MORE >>

Deetz published in special issue of Slavery and Abolition academic journal

Kelley Deetz

Kelley Deetz, visiting professor of sociology, contributed an article to a special issue of Slavery and Abolition: A Journal of Slave and Post-Slave Studies. Published June 1, the theme of the issue was “A Forum on Slavery and Universities.” Deetz’s article was entitled, “Finding dignity in a landscape of fear: enslaved women and girls at... READ MORE >>

Summer Research project analyzing textbook costs

Lewis Ward '20 and Stephen Krueger, access and outreach services librarian at Randolph, work together in the Lipscomb Library.

The average American college student pays around $1,200 for textbooks during any given academic year, according to Stephen Krueger, the access and outreach services librarian at Randolph. This summer, he and Lewis Ward ’20 are teaming up to see how Randolph compares. For their Summer Research project, Krueger and Ward are examining the maximum and... READ MORE >>

Randolph professor’s research cited by U.S. News & World Report

John Abell

John Abell, the Carl Stern Chair of Economics at Randolph, was recently cited in an article by U.S. News & World Report for his research on food deserts. Food deserts are defined as urban areas in which it is difficult to buy affordable or fresh, high quality food. Abell has conducted extensive research on the... READ MORE >>

Visiting professor’s book highlighted in Savor magazine

Kelley Deetz

A book by Kelley Deetz, visiting sociology professor at Randolph, is highlighted in the latest issue of Virginia’s Savor magazine. The article features a Q&A with Deetz, and highlights some of the historical recipes found in her book, Bound to the Fire: How Virginia’s Enslaved Cooks Helped Invent American Cuisine. Savor is a free magazine,... READ MORE >>

Randolph professor tabbed as first diversity ambassador for national Brewers Association

Janel Jackson-Beckham

Janel Jackson-Beckham, a communication studies professor at Randolph, has been named the first-ever diversity ambassador for the national Brewers Association. In the new role, Jackson-Beckham will travel around the country to state guild and other craft brewing community events to speak on best practices for diversifying both customer bases and staff and to listen to... READ MORE >>